Olive the Lionheart by Brad Ricca

This true story tells about the adventures of Olive MacLeod, a thirty year old Scottish woman who decides to go to Africa to find her fiance who has been reported missing. Olive handles all the difficulties and invisible dangers that she has to deal with in her quest in 1910 Africa. She was so bold and courageous with her encounters that it makes the reader proud to hear of such a woman in that time of history. This is definitely a four star read for anyone with an adventurous soul!

Thursday’s Bride by Patricia Johns

This extraordinary story revolves a young Amish widow and her twin daughters living with her in-laws. She has to deal with old secrets, past loves and the idea of marrying again. This book was just a delight to read. The author developed the characters in a deep and realistic way that has the reader thinking that she not only “knows” the characters but understands the way they think! She has woven a sweet story that is guaranteed to delight anyone who loves to read an endearing tale!

The Last Diet by Shahroo Izadi

I really enjoyed reading this book because it was not a strict plan that you have to follow in order to lose weight. I appreciated reading about the author’s own weight lose and her ideas about breaking old habits in order to eat in a healthy manner. I guess that’s what it all goes down to; figuring out things in your eating habits that need to be changed and having the will and determination to make those changes. A great companion for anyone who is facing the tough job of changing your life to benefit your body and health forever.

Relentless in Texas by Kari Lynn Dell

Gil Sanchez was once a huge success on the rodeo circuit but now he is fighting to retain his sobriety and continue healing his body after the injury that ended his career. Gil is fighting to continue his independence when he runs into Carmelita White Fox. He is instantly drawn to her and the feeling is mutual. This contemporary romance is moving and intense. Strong characters and a good story make this a great summer read!

Constable on the Hill by Nick Rhea

Police constable Nick Rhea and his family move to the quaint village of Aidensfield, said to be one of the most beautiful spots in the country. Their home is perched high on the moor with a lovely view of the countryside. This cozy mystery is a delight to read! Constable Nick is always poised to help out anyone, no matter if it is a clever horse or an unclothed lady! I recommend this entertaining book to give you plenty of chuckles as well as hours of fun!

Healing the Rancher by Mary Sue Jackson

Carter has had a terrible accident on a horse that has left him with debilitating injuries. He hires Willow, a physical therapist, to live on his ranch and help him rehabilitate. Willow brings along her young son who has issues from seeing his crazy father abuse his mother. I know that this probably sounds like just all the other romances but that’s not the case. Author, Mary Sue Jackson, does a phenomenal job of developing her characters and writing a story that was endearing, interesting and kept me up reading into the night. Yes, it is steamy but it was just a good story that I found to be very engaging and I really loved it!

Promise at Pebble Creek by Lisa Jones Baker

A sweet story about a young, Amish woman, Hannah Lapp who runs the town’s “Amish Eatables”. She has a new, Englischer customer, Marcus Jackson, who has just become a Christian and is very eager to make friends. He ends up renting a place on Hannah’s family land and their friendship becomes closer as they begin to explore the possibility of making their relationship last. I enjoyed this very endearing story of Hannah and Marcus. I would recommend it to anyone who loves this type of romance.

What You Wish For by Katherine Center

I really expected to love this book because I read Katherine Center’s, Things You Save in a Fire and dearly loved it! This book fell flat for me after it had so many things going for it. The story takes place on Galveston Island, Texas, a place I live very close to. It was about schools and a librarian and I’m a retired teacher/librarian. It had romance in it and I love romance! But, this story did not make me want to sit and read for hours, it didn’t excite me, in fact, I really just wanted it to end! The book had too many characters that I didn’t care for and a school that sounded like none I’ve ever worked in. There was of course, a case of unrequited love that had no sparks or believably. Sorry, it was just not a book for me.

Hello, Summer by Mary Kay Andrews

Sarah Conley Hawkins was a highly successful reporter for a big newspaper in Atlanta. She decides to change jobs and then suddenly that job doesn’t work out. Conley retreats to her grandmother’s home in Florida to figure out what she will do with her life now. Soon after returning home, she witnesses a strange car accident that takes the life of a Florida congressman. She decides to begin investigative reporting for the local family newspaper and finds a murky past in the life of the dead congressman. This ignites her to dig deeper into this dangerous story to find out the real truth. A great story and engaging characters make this a great book to put at the top of your summer reading lists!

The English Wife by Adrienne Chinn

The story of a family, in 1940’s England and in 2000’s Newfoundland. Ellie is a young lady in 1940, just beginning a new job and dealing with World War II. She meets a soldier from Newfoundland while she is engaged to her life-long friend, George. The future story begins on 9/11, 2001. Ellie had an estranged sister, Dottie, that lived back in England . Her adult daughter, Sophie, is on a flight to NY City that is diverted to Newfoundland because of 9/11. Sophie meets a biker, Sam, and the story begins. The book moves from present to past in each chapter. I never have been a fan of books written this way and it holds true for this one. I think the continuity of the story is out of sync this way and the reader loses any momentum gained in interest along the way. It also makes the characters more one-dimensional and shallow. The results are characters that the reader cannot identify with or even care about.